HWW5 – Wald Wasser Wildnis Weg

Die Geschichte ist schnell erzählt. Falscher letzter Zug. Gestrandet in Kall – sowas ist immer ärgerlich. Um das Gemünd zu beruhigen schnell am dortigen Nationalparktor vorbeigeschaut und dann auf dem schnellsten Weg zurück zu einem frequentierten Bahnhof. Das war in dem Fall Langerwehe – perfekt zu erreichen über den Hauptwanderweg 5 des Eifelvereins von Gemünd nach Langerwehe. Elegant.

Nachts allein im starken Dauerregen war die erste Hälfte ereignisarm. Mit ca. 2 Meter Sichtweite im kalten Regen war es so eine der Passagen in der der Genuss ganz im Vordergrund steht. Scheinbar muss man auf jeder Tour durch die Nordeifel einmal nach Schmidt hoch – warum auch immer. Sonst waren große Teile der Strecke bekannt vom Wildnistrail und dem Nord-Eifel-Ultra von Stefan. Also schnell durch und ab in den Zug in Langerwehe.

Wald – auf jeden Fall, Wasser – reichlich von oben, Wildnis – vermutlich war ich verantwortlich für 100% der Mobilitätsdaten in der Nordeifel in dieser Nacht. Allein und doch beäugt von zahllosen Augen zwischen den Bäumen inmitten gleichgültig fallenden kalten Tropfen.

Damit ist der nächste der Hauptwanderwege des Eifelvereins abgehakt!

100 mi Hangeweiher #aachenläuft

Die Aktion #aachenläuft ist eine schöne Idee und funktioniert technisch echt gut wenn man die Hinweise der Organisatoren zur Nutzung der App beachtet. So kann man ganz gemütlich am Hangeweiher 2 oder 4 Runden drehen, dabei etwas für den guten Zweck tun und in diesen verrückten Corona-Monaten etwas Zeit an der frischen Luft verbringen. Also Ihr Aachener – raus an den Weiher!

Das schöne Wetter am Wochenende war zu einladend – 68 Runden (17×9.2 km) auf der Strecke plus einige Runden unten am Weiher machen auch 100 Meilen voll. In 23 Stunden und 45 Minuten eine gegen Ende doch sehr anstrengende Angelegenheit. Vielen Dank an alle die vorbei geschaut haben und ganz besonders an Uwe. Wir haben uns das erste Mal gesehen, aber es brauchte nur kurz bis wir uns gut verstanden haben. #1 und #2 der Rangliste gemeinsam auf der Runde – das hat Spaß gemacht.

Das Ende.
Nein, das ist nicht die HF.

Für die Statistik: #19 – check.

Behind the Curtain

Winter is coming. Soon the running season is over and the ultra running season starts. Finally all the hustle and bustle ends. The trails are slowly but surely emptying again. It gets colder and darker. Rare sunlight spreads over half-frozen muddy, dirty and lonely trails. One is the only human striving through the nothingness. The breath freezes to clouds of mist in front of the headlamp and the crunch of the trail shoes on frozen ground is the only noise to be heard. Miles are coming and miles are going out there in the fresh, ice-cold and crisp shapes.

Blurry figures on the move.

As it will be Corona-winter too and with rising numbers nothing is certain and granted. We are not sure which of our plans will become reality but we want to be prepared.

So my friends and me sat together to review ultra running. Not that ultra running in general was in question but I think there is one thing that unites and drives all of us: the longing of this one feeling. In our post-LT 250/500 race reviews we have been discussing quite a lot about our personal experiences out there and the moments we talked about most were not the ones full of joy or success. But the moments in which one finally understands and accepts the vastness of the surroundings and what a small piece oneself is in this big puzzle. The moments of exceeding the obvious borders the race puts upon you and the awareness that there is more beyond. VPsucher came back from his 360k DH win with similar experiences of sheer existence in the middle of the dunes with no human around for hours. It is a lonely but great feeling. Remote. Tackled. Beaten. And yet: moving and full of determination to finish.

One of the special moments in 2020. And I was only the one taking the picture.

We started to create something to share these moments together with a small group of similar-minded runners and friends. Running and racing on the grounds and in the areas we love with a certain level of difficulty. Rare-support to self-support events of pure running. Enjoying the art of creating the GPX-files and looking forward to fill them with some running. The set of runs we came up with will be challenging enough to have plenty options to fail. We combined them to a set for the real collectors among us.

We may spread the rumours when it seems applicable. Or we may not. Behind the curtain we will do some running of the type we think running should be: low-cost, free of limits, simple and pure. The paths ahead are laid out. Who will be able to follow them until the very end? In a good, old tradition it is meant to start around Halloween 2020.

On? On!

GR Hageland 2020

Finally running together re-started. Took the car to Belgium to enter a self-supported 150k track last weekend. The secret is to not stop before the track ends. No matter what.

Had some amazing hours the morning after. Enjoying the afterglow of the walk with the 5 finishers and RD family with delicious food in a late-summer morning breeze. Sitting there, joking, eating and discussing is the essence of our understanding of running. Priceless. Thanks to all for that great weekend.

Start
Waiting for the night.
Waiting for the night.

runalyze.com / 150.32 km Laufen: GR Hageland – TypeII Fun / 05.09.2020
1d 01:17:24 / 10:06/km / 1,061 m D+

The circle is closed – AOBtD 2020

Let me start with the Another One Bites the Dust poem by Teun Geurts. Teun was supporting this year and his words fit perfectly – thanks Teun:

They were thirteen and they were running
They started running when the sun went down
They ran into the dark and all through the night
When the sun came up and warmed the dust
And still the thirteen were running

They ran for no special reason, it’s just what they do
They ran for no special reason, into the light

The sun ran its course all through the sky
And still the thirteen were running
They ran their course on the face of the earth
The wind in their faces, biting the dust
And still the thirteen were running

They ran for no special reason, it’s just what they do
They ran for no special reason, chasing the light

The light started to fade from the sky
And still the thirteen were running
Rain on their faces, washing the dust
Hundreds of swallows sweeping the sky
And still the thirteen were running

They ran for no special reason, it’s just what they do
They ran for no special reason, into the night

The Legends Slam 2019-2020 is done. Since the very first race of the series The Great Escape back in November 2019 the idea of just crossing one by one of it from the agenda somehow got me. What was a far away dream back then started to become more and more realistic. Even more so with the Legends Trail 250 finish this February. Only one to go. Corona hit all of us and races were cancelled one by one and Another One Bites the Dust was postponed and finally cancelled. But not for the 13 runners still in the race for The Legends Slam.

Being one of the lucky ones I was allowed to participate in a very special race. Huge thanks to the LT Team/Legendary Friends for putting the whole trail city up for the few of us. It was a very nice, calm and unique atmosphere. As I did not bring any crew, Fanny thankfully agreed to help me and did an amazing job. We grew into a good team and her support became more and more crucial the longer the race lasted and helped a lot to keep me up and running.

The race itself is hard to describe – you better do it yourself to understand how it is. Basically it is all about timing and thing which can happen to you is, that you find a rhythm that consumes you in a way that you stop thinking and act like a machine doing the same job over and over again – run the same 6.3 km loop:

AOBtD splits

For me it started to become difficult somewhat around loop 18. But well, on one point it should get difficult. I was not able to make up my mind to fully switch to race mode and I stayed with the mantra: just finish the 28 loops by whatever means. Then you are free again.

What impressed me most was the fact how those 12 runners around me faced the task. Running amongst these Legends made me proud. No mistakes, discipline and precision all over. It was like looking at a fine-tuned pice of art. Every step well chosen, each corner perfectly cut, each piece of runnable ground used – amazing performance.

And finally. Saturday night 23:55 it was finally over. 28 loops done – Legends Slam 2019-2020 finished. What a relieve it was…

The Finish.
The DNF job needs to be done!
The End.

I think it is time to rest now. And to say thank you to my family who accepts my running and to the inner circle of runners/friends which was formed throughout the last 2-3 exciting years and which is always a source of motivation and power. This success would not have been possible without all of you. What can possibly come after all of this? Who knows.

But with friends like I have I expect it to be spectacular.

Halbzeit 2020

Was ein erstes Halbjahr 2020. Der Start ins Jahr war schon vielversprechend: zuerst die Tour im Hohen Venn mit Maarten und Marek und dann natürlich der etwas feuchte mAMa 2020.

Und dann der Legends Trail 250 2020. Was eine erstaunliche Reise durch 3 Nächte und zwei Tage es doch war. An Tag 3 endlich aus dem letzten unendlichen Flusstal aufzutauchen, das Ziel zum Greifen nah mit dem letzten Sonnenaufgang im Rücken – es war ein unbeschreibliches Gefühl. Über 60 Stunden Eins mit der Natur und jetzt sollte es zurück ins echte Leben gehen? Soziale Interaktion? Wie soll das funktionieren?

LT250 – KM 259/261 – 60+h – coming home. Or am I leaving home?

Es folgte die Corona-Zeit welche durch einige Challenges doch kurzweiliger und laufintensiver wurde als gedacht. Wir waren hier in Deutschland doch sehr privilegiert was die Einschränkungen anging. Duivelse Uitdaging 1 & 2 by Marek waren jedenfalls ein amüsanter Zeitvertreib. Mit den momentan möglichen Lockerungen kehrte auch endlich das lange Laufen zurück. Ein Gruppenlauf auf der verbesserten UTDS-Strecke war der perfekte Wiedereinstieg in das Ultralaufen und die perfekte Gelegenheit im Legends-Trail Gebiet in Erinnerungen zu schwelgen. Exquisite Truppe – gerade in diesem Gebiet. Experten-Runde quasi. UTDS Legends Edition.

Wie unterschiedlich und doch gleich die Momente. Sogar den direkten Bild-Vergleich gibt es – war das Wetter beim LT250 wirklich so schön?

Insgesamt steht 2020 nach 200 Tagen nicht schlecht da.

Progression Graph from RUNALYZE. 2019 vs. 2020 – Tag 200.

Und wie soll es jetzt weiter gehen? Schwer vorauszusagen mit dem Virus im Hintergrund. Doch die Pläne sind soweit gemacht. In 5 Wochen wird es richtig ernst. Der letzte Teil des Legends-Slam steht an: Another One Bites the Dust – AOBtD. 28 x 6.3 km warten mindestens – jede Stunde eine Runde. Keine Möglichkeit Zeit rauszulaufen: das wird eine langsame und konstante Qual. Aber die Verlockung den Slam zu erringen ist riesig. Hoffen wir, dass die Motivation und die Kraft für diesen würdigen Abschluss der Legends Trail Reihe reichen.

#1 #2 #3 – #4?

Anfang September und Ende Oktober sind 2 privatere und exklusivere Läufe geplant. Darüber wird es erst im Nachgang oder kurz vorher Infos zu geben. Wenn das alles so läuft wie geplant sollte 2020 mit genügend Herausforderungen zu Ende gehen.

*** UTDS plus 2020 ***

Time for a little adventure next weekend to finally kickoff ultra-running after this period of social distancing and closed borders. It will be a pleasure to be able to meet this group of extraordinary runners and to finally be able to go back to a nice patch of Belgium: the Ardennes.

We chose the UTDS (Ultra Tour des Sources) a permanent market Extratrail route with a few „improvements“ to include some beautiful parts the original UTDS track avoids for whatever reasons. The final distance is around 100 Miles with approx. 5000 m D+ and the scenery will be stunning.

We will start at 0800 „sharp“ on Saturday 04.07.2020 and as we like to bore you to death there will be a live tracking. To bore you even more there will be only one dot as we will stick together as a group. ONE. DOT. It may be the purest and most intense Legends Tracking experience you will have in your entire life so make sure to enjoy every second. There you go:

http://battleofthebulge.legendstracking.com/

Legends Trail 250 – Flashback

For me ultra running truly starts at the point where I have given up. To continue a run after this point seems mentally and physically impossible – the battle is finally lost at the end of a long fight.

Beyond that point it is not getting any easier or less painful. Quite the contrary. But as I already lost against myself I am truly whole again. No longer divided between the urge to continue and the longing to quit. I don’t have to go through those deepest of all valleys again. There is suddenly a feeble light at the end of this tunnel.

CP1. Night 1/3 down.

It´s Sunday evening – somewhere out there. What a journey so far – 200k in 48h. Two nights and two days full of ups and downs: both physically and mentally.

Around 10k earlier I was in a good condition. The 4th and last CP finally in reach, the promised bad weather still calm and the head in a good mood full of hope again.

And now? Pouring, cold rain, really tough last kilometres (and that despite the fact that it was mostly going downhill on easy terrain) and again some thoughts on the greater meaning of all that. Plus: the track is gone. The GPX of that stage ended 200 m ago but where is that checkpoint now. It is cold and getting dark – the third night is about to start. There are some houses but the street is empty and abandoned. What am I doing here? What a cold and lonely place. I am exhausted and desperate for some rest or better: the end of all of this. It takes me 10 minutes to actually see the LT sign directing me to the back of a house and the door to the warm and comfortable CP. A sign of how desperate the situation seems to be. After the now routine actions at the CP and two plates of Pasta – decisions have to be made.

Or wait – there is nothing more to decide on: the path ahead finally crystal clear. Although it was comfortable to not run for some moments and just sit indoor, although the weather out there is awful and although the final stages is again 60k long and mostly dark. Although it will take more energy I have left…

It is time. Time to be superior of all that doubts and problems. Time to really earn that moment of relieve at the very end. The only option left with no matter what is waiting out there is: to go out again and finish.

Finish.
Finish.
Finish. Thanks Harry de Vries for all the pictures!

Does it matter after all?

Throwback January 2020. Hautes Fagnes. The idiots doing a night training session.

It is cold, dark, the track is watery and slippery – no other human knows our exact location (and we are sometimes not too sure about it ourselves). We are together and yet alone. Lost in the Belgium winter – driven by a indescribable force. Again out there while we should be at home sleeping. Witnessed only by the stars and a few creatures hidden in the bushes around. Immense tiny dots on that earth. Unnoticed but still moving.

In the aftermath of that run an E-Mail flow circled through our E-Mail postboxes with the nice title: „In case you really think it matters what you do…“

The only other content of that E-Mail was a link to a YT-video with a time-lapse animation with some predictions about the end of the universe within the next trillions of years…

Sometimes – while running out there – the vastness, the emptiness, the cold and the dark finally closes the grip around you. It is like trying to resist against the final destiny of becoming some forever frozen atoms in an expanding universal vastness waiting for the end of time. Determined to try to fight this destiny and yet sure that ultimately there will be no way out. Immensely enjoying the company of the fellowship of runners and feeling a strong bond within the group.

But: will it make a difference? Does it all matter after all?

No.

How could it.

LT250 – der Bericht

Ein unendlicher Dank gilt dem Orga-Team, den Supportern und den Legendary Friends (oft Ultraläufer, die als Support angereist waren und die Betreuung mit übernommen haben). Die Intensität der Stimmung, der Emotionen und des Zusammenhalt sowie der Support war einmalig. Die wenigen CPs die dieser Lauf aufbietet sind die Inseln der Hoffnung in diesem unerbittlichen Lauf. Und doch wird einem dort von jedem nahegelegt, dass es nur einen Weg gibt – wieder zurück auf die Strecke.

Ein ebenso großer Dank gilt der Support WA-Gruppe sowie allen, die über Einzelnachrichten digitalen Support geschickt haben. Jede Nachricht hat mich angetrieben und davon abgehalten aufzugeben. Ich bin das Ding für Euch gelaufen. Danke Matthias für den besonders engen Support, das Mitfiebern mit jedem Schritt und dem Telefonat kurz vor Ende der 4. Etappe. Ich hoffe du hast dich inzwischen auch wieder erholt?

Danken möchte ich zudem den anderen Teilnehmenden. Mit vielen habe ich viele Kilometer geteilt, mich lange unterhalten, einfach schweigend mit ihnen gelitten oder bin auch mal gefühlt stundenlang hinterher ihnen her gelaufen. Vielleicht auch nicht nur gefühlt. Es waren tolle Erlebnisse. Lasst uns einander unsere unterschiedlichen Launen und Zustände verzeihen und mit Demut schätzen lernen, dass wir uns so oft über den Weg gelaufen sind und dort draußen nicht allein sein mussten. Ich hab Euch leiden sehen, euch verwirrt inden Wald schauen sehen, Euch über der Navigation verzweifeln sehen, Euch kämpfen sehen. Nach dem Lauf habe ich das Gefühl: jeder der dort überhaupt antritt hat tiefen Respekt verdient – zu welchem Ende es auch am Ende gereicht hat.

Plan war es, die Etappe 1 (Start Freitagabend 1800) mit ihren 60 km in ca. 10 Stunden bis 0400 am Samstagmorgen über die Bühne zu bringen. Damit wäre schon etwas Polster auf den Cutoff gewonnen und das Tempo sollte trotzdem nicht überzogen sein. Der Start in der Abenddämmerung hatte es in sich. Schnell ging es runter zum Ufer der Ourthe. Schnell wurde klar, was die Schwierigkeit des Legends Trails darstellen würde: unwegsames Gelände. Wurzelige, steinige Trails – durch die gut gefüllt Ourthe teils überflutet – steil, schräg, rutschig. Jeder einzelne Schritt kräftezährend. Aufpassen war angesagt. Bei ca. Kilometer 12 ein Abhang, der nur durch hinabstürzen/rutschen zu überwinden war, gefolgt von einem durch Bäume blockiertem Trail – welcher durch Klettern in einem Dornenfeld umgangen werden musste. Wenn man nach einer so kurzen Zeit im Rennen schon auf 2-3 km/h zurückgeworfen wird fängt der Kopf an zu arbeiten. Was kann das nur geben – das ist doch gemacht um Unmöglich zu sein. Und doch: es war massig Zeit und ich hab mich schnell an das Mantra erinnert, an das es sich zu halten galt: Ruhe bewahren und nicht wegen Lappalien das Rennen verlassen. Es wurde nach 15 km besser und die restlichen 45 km sind ohne große Erinnerungen geblieben. Das heißt sie musst einigermaßen annehmbar gewesen sein. Das Finale bot ein eher zugewachsener/blockierter Trail bergab zum CP1.

CP1 war ein mit Ofen beheizter Raum mit langen Tischen. Nach der durchlaufenen Nacht war es die ersehnte Pause. Trotzdem gelang es mir nicht wie gewünscht in den Pausenmodus zu verfallen und die wertvolle, weil rare Erholung zu finden. Mein Platz in der Nähe der Tür ließ mich nicht wirklich zur Ruhe kommen. Der Teller Nudeln mit Hackfleischsosse tat gut. Umziehen war auch angesagt – neues Unterhemd, neue Socken, dann wieder in die Sealskinz und zurück in die Schuhe. Ich hatte auf der ersten Etappe einiges der selbstgemachten Bratlinge und Pizzateilchen gegessen, diesen Teil der Verpflegung habe ich im Rucksack ersetzt. Den Rest der Verpflegung hatte ich nicht angerührt und so gab es da wenig neu zu packen und der Rucksack war nach dem Auffüllen der Wasserblase schnell wieder komplett. Ich fühlte noch immer diese Unruhe und es wurde Zeit den CP1 nach der ohnehin schon vergangenen Stunde wieder zu verlassen. Um ca. 0500 am Samstamorgen ging es also los auf Etappe 2.

Etappe 2 stand an und mit ihr der Abschnitt mit den meisten Höhenmetern. Dafür aber endlich Tageslicht. Aus den Trainings, Rennen wie dem Ohm-Trail oder Olne-Spa-Olne bin ich ja einigen Kummer gewohnt. Aber da sind dann ein paar Anstiege drin und gut ist. Und vor allem sind die nach 50-70 km wieder rum. Beim LT250, mit schon über 60 km in den Beinen, diese unerbittlichen Steigungen zu erklimmen und direkt im Anschluss wieder abzusteigen – mit dem Wissen, dass es die nächsten Stunden einfach mal so bleiben würde – das ist eine andere Nummer. Teilweise 300 HM an Stück hoch, wieder runter, wieder rauf. 10, 15, 20% Steiguns/Gefälle-Prozente. Wunderschöne Ardennen, wirklich. Aber ohne Gnade. Ziel auf dieser zweiten Etappe war ein Daylight-Finish. Das hat mit ca. 1800 und ca. 13 Stunden für die 65 km so gerade geklappt. Ungefähr 24 Stunden für 123 km. Und jetzt so richtig erschlagen und geschlaucht. Was. Ein. Brocken.

Jetzt aber mal ein Stopp der entspannt. Auch am CP2 war die Unruhe während der ersten Minuten noch da. Aber insgesamt war die Stimmung ob des größeren Raums und der Müdigkeit aller etwas ruhiger. Dann, nach einem Teller Reis mit Irgendwas, habe ich die einzig richtige Entscheidung getroffen: die gewaschenen und sehr schmerzhaften Füße in die erfahrenen Hände der Exile Medics gegeben. Föhnen, Aufstechen, Beschneiden, Tapen und danach frische Socken sowie frische Sealskinz drüber. Und siehe da – Humpeln ging wieder. Nächste Entscheidung: Schuhe wechseln. Das war mehr ein unterbewusster Reflex und ein Risiko. Das zweite Paar ist bisher kaum gelaufen und quasi frisch gekauft. Aber ich konnte dem Gefühl fast neuer Hokas mit ordentlich Grip nicht wiederstehen. Auch der Rest der Klamotten wurde ausgetauscht und verstärkt – schließlich wartete die zweite Nacht und die Ausläufer des Hohen Venns. Kurz vor 20 Uhr ging es weiter – nur noch 2,5 Stunden vor dem Cutoff.

Etappe 3 war 38 km kurz und hatte zudem wenige Höhenmeter zu bieten. Also einfach Augen zu und durch? Natürlich nicht. Es sollte der Horror werden und mich dorthin zurückwerfen, wo ich nie wieder hin wollte. Zunächst ging es ganz gut los – ein stetiges Ansteigen hoch in die Region des Hohen Venns. Die Höhen dort haben dann zwar weniger Höhenmeter aber natürlich ist es ausgesetzt, windig, eisig, komplett unter Wasser und haben damit ganz besonders tolle Qualitäten. Es wurde nun brutal. Gut, dass wir in wechselnden Gruppen zusammen waren und insgesamt sehr viele Läufer auf einem engen Abschnitt dort oben unterwegs waren. Immer gut mal ein Licht im Moor zu sehen… Die Freude endlich wieder aus der Höhe absteigen zu können wich schnell dem totalen Horror. Die Streckenführung sah für die letzten 7 km bis zum CP3 klettern vor. In einer regnerischen zweiten Nacht. Und zwar nicht irgendwie. Sondern teilweise auf allen Vieren. An Bäume geklammert. Pech, dass auch noch das mentale Tief total durchschlug. Der Tiefpunkt war erreicht. Der Kopf leer. Die Abstiege die zu bewältigen waren waren verdammt gefährlich, die Kraft weg und der Wille fast gebrochen. 5 km vor Ende hab ich die große Truppe weggeschickt. Ich war am Ende und wollte alleine sein. Ich sah sie auf dem Trail entschwinden und wusste: das wars. Meine Stirnlampe versagte den Geist. Entweder sie war aus oder leuchtete mit 200 Lumen (was bedeutet der Akku ist innerhalb weniger Stunden erschöpft). Das waren jetzt echte Probleme. Mir war kalt. Das Handy konnte ich nicht mehr bedienen, die Supporter eh alle im Bett. Was also tun? Gut, dass die Wege Flüsse waren und der Wind kräftig bließ. Ich hatte Angst zu unterkühlen und wusste die einzige Rettung liegt 5 km weiter hinter 2-3 der schlimmsten Hängen der Ardennen. Also irgendwie weiter. Die Ab- und Aufstiege in halber Bewusstlosigkeit sind sicher der Stoff aus dem die Trail-Horrorfilme gemacht sind. Ich hatte doch garnicht nach Barkley-Training gefragt. Um ca. 6 Uhr morgens erreichte ich gebrochen CP3. Es muss auch irgendwann mal Schluss sein. 100 Meilen geschafft.

Am CP3 herrschte eine merkwürdige Stimmung. Tiefe Depression und unbändiger Wille. Viele versuchten draußen zu schlafen. Ich habs garnicht erst versucht. Ich wollte die letzten Lebensgeister nicht auch noch einschläfern. Wieder Pediküre. Kartoffelbrei mit Irgendwas. Was mich dazu bewogen hat den Rucksack wieder zu packen – wer weiß das schon. Es wäre ein bildhübsches DNF geworden. Aber irgendwas bewog mich zu der Aussage: Nachts gibst du nicht auf und den nächsten Tag guckst du dir zumindest nochmal kurz an.

Und zack. Nach dem tiefsten Tief das höchste Hoch. Zwar war es nebelig und nicht wirklich hell, aber es gab Tageslicht. Und ein paar laufbare Passagen. Ich fühlte mich plötzlich wieder lebendig und beflügelt am Beginn der 4. Etappe. Ich war noch drin. Der Übermut ließ mich das sorgsame Navigieren kurz aus den Augen verlieren und in den 10 Minuten Weg suchen sah alles dann nicht mehr ganz so rosig aus. Danach rannte ich regelrecht. Ein großer Fehler und ein stechender Schmerz in der Wade. Fuck. Sollte es das gewesen sein? Schmerzen. Bei jedem Schritt. Das Rennglück wie abgerissen, schien es. Aber nach einigen Minuten Humpeln wurde es etwas erträglicher. Nach einer Stunde gehen ging wieder langsames Joggen. Vielleicht gab es ja doch eine Chance. Irgendwie zu CP4 kommen. Aber es wären nicht die Ardennen, wenn das einfach geworden wäre. Der versprochene Sturm und Regen hatten sich zwar verspätet und abgeschwächt aber sie kamen. Die letzten 10 der 40 km dieses Abschnittes waren von Regen und Wind geprägt. Und es wurde schon wieder dunkel. Unfassbar. Der kalte Regen war ein Schlag ins Gesicht. Völlig nass und kalt war ich endlich dort wo der Track endete. Aber wo war der verdammte CP? 10 Minuten im Regen stehend habe ich gebraucht um den Pfeil zu entdecken. Die Verwirrtheit nahm also zu. Aber endlich rein ins Warme.

Am CP4 war die erste Handlung: raus aus den nassen Klamotten und ab auf die Heizung mit ihnen. Und dann mal Hinsetzen und über das Leben und die eigenen Handlungen nachdenken. Neben dem leckeren Essen (2 Portionen mit Irgendwas mit Nudeln), dem Umpacken des Rucksackes und dem Umziehen bestimmten die Fakten das Denken. Es war möglich hier 2 Stunden vor dem Cutoff wieder rauszugehen. Knapp zwar, aber 2 Stunden sind 2 Stunden. Es geht mir miserabel aber ehrlich: was hatte ich erwartet. Schon über 200 km, 48 Stunden im Rennen, keine Minute Schlaf. Das kann nicht spurlos an einem vorbei gehen. Draußen strömender Regen – also an Schlaf irgendwo nicht zu denken. Und sowieso: dafür wäre keine Zeit. Ich war nicht so weit gekommen um raus zu gehen. Also die teilweise nassen Klamotten wieder an und Zähne zusammenbeißen. Ich hatte doch alles dabei: zwei mehr oder weniger kaputte Stirnlampen, ein nasser Rucksack voller Essen und einen letzten Rest Hoffnung. Worauf wartete ich noch? Raus in den Regen.

Der Beginn der 5. Etappe hatte es dann in sich. Es lief garnicht mehr. Es war unfassbar kalt (Müdigkeit). Der Regen. Das Ziel noch zu weit weg um zu ziehen. Ich war nicht allein unterwegs und das war echt gut so. Jetzt setzte nämlich der Kopf aus. Nach 50 Stunden ohne Schlaf war der Bogen endgültig überspannt. Es erschienen die Geister die ich rief. Am Rand des Kegels der Stirnlampe fing alles an zu verschwimmen und zu tanzen. Die Beine der Läufer vor mir führten Tänze auf, die Kapuzen hatten hinten Gesichter. Das ist an und für sich recht spaßig. Aber es lenkt ab. Und dann die huschenden Gestalten und Menschen zwischen den Bäumen am Rande des Gesichtsfeld. Teils betrachtete ich mich von der Seite mit den Armen wedelnd im verzweifelten Versuch die bösen Geister zu verscheuchen. Ultralaufen ist etwas für Genießer. Ok – Reißleine ziehen. 10 Minuten an einen Schlammhang lehnen und schlafen. Die Kälte danach war unerträglich aber die Geister verzogen sich wieder etwas. Gut, dass es auf halbem Weg nochmal einen weiteren CP gab. Ein beheiztes Zelt, Sandwiches, Schutz vor de Elementen. Der Aufbruch nach einer kurzen Pause war natürlich brutal, aber von hier waren es noch 28 km. Sollte es doch gehen? Alle waren am Ende mit den Nerven. Unsere Gruppe zerfiel langsam. Die Tempi passten nicht übereinander. Ich hatte das Gefühl allein sein zu wollen. Musik auf die Ohren und das eigene Tempo suchen. Kompliziert. Aber mal wieder ein paar Meter laufbar. Die Warnung vor dem Start war: nehmt Euch ein paar Stunden Puffer mit auf die letzten 15 km. Das wurde zur großen Sorge bzw. zum Fokus. Gas geben – alles was noch geht und sicher und zügig ins Finale eintauchen. Diese Konzentration hielt mich wach und einigermaßen fokussiert. Noch 14 km. Ich kannte die Gegend. Es waren einige Bäume gefallen und die Hänge sind sehr, sehr steil. Aber alles in allem war ich nach ein paar Kilometern gehen und Klettern am Ufer und den Hängen der Ourthe erleichtert. Es lässt sich aushalten. Noch 8 km.

Was hatte ich inden vergangenen drei Nächten und zwei Tagen nicht alles erleben dürfen. Und jetzt war es wirklich da: das Finale. So langsam stellte sich die tiefe Dankbarkeit und Demut ein, die ich so sehr schätze und die nur echte Herausforderungen hervorrufen. Die Tatsache, dass die Sonne wirklich wieder aufging und nur noch 7 km auf der Uhr waren rührte mich zu Tränen. Es würde tatsächlich klappen. Diese Tatsache überwältigte mich so, dass ich eine Pause einlegen musste. Ewig hätte ich dort am Ufer der Ourthe stehen können und den Nebelschwaden beim Aufsteigen zusehen können. Und dann war es da, das nächste Gefühl: sieh zu, dass du wirklich ins Ziel läufst – jetzt hast du es dir verdammt nochmal verdient. Was für emotionale letzte Kilometer. Fast zu überwältigt von den Emotionen um das Finish zu denken, so sehr angezogen davon und mit diesem eigenartigen Bedauern: sollte diese Reise tatsächlich ein Ende finden?

Ich würde diese 361.930 Schritte doch eh niemandem vernünftig erklären können und es wird auch keiner je diese Emotionen nachvollziehen können. Ich war etwas traurig – es würde ein langer Weg zurück ins normale Leben werden. Die Gefahr bei jeder Reise ist, dass man verändert von ihr zurück kommt.